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Crossbow Hunting in Wisconsin
Last Post 12 Feb 2012 06:40 PM by Chris Larsen. 14 Replies.
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Chris LarsenUser is Offline
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Chris Larsen

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03 Jan 2011 12:07 AM

    I found this story on the net about Wisconsin considering the use of crossbows for all deer hunters during the regular archery season.  Of course, there is some push back by the archery association. 

    http://www.jsonline.com/sports/outd...55229.html

    What do you think?

     

    -CL

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    03 Jan 2011 07:13 AM
    What do I think, well I do think and the archery association known as North American Bowhunter's Coalition does not. They constantly attack the crossbow because it is not in the Pope and Young rules, well neither is luminocs but you see everyone using them, and so forth. Never the less from my experience with legalizing the crossbow in Louisiana, once again the NABC will take on the tactics of anti-hunters and blow the whole issue on the floor of the Wisconsin legislature. They have become quite a joke really, as they just don't know what they are talking about. One thing for sure once you start hunting with a crossbow you will see they are not superior to the compound bow. But then I know crossbows and they don't. The crossbow is awkward and unwieldy, and almost impossible to silence making it only truly effective to about 40 yards, anything beyond that and the deer will jump the string.

    I hosted the first ACF crossbow state championship ever held. Shooting the best equipment money can buy I did not see a shooter there that could stand toe to toe with any vertical competitive archer with modern equipment.

    I took a shot at 45 yards at a buck with his head down and looking away and he still jumped the string, even at 300 fps.....

    But that is only the tip of the iceberg, the only thing the NABC will do is stir up trouble, divest themselves in emotion and lose like they always do. Now you may want to know how far they will go. Individuals that believe in their cause have attacked me in the field, even after the crossbow was legalized, I mean very clearly it was physically. So at this point I will hunt with my crossbow, remembering my bayonet training there is one thing you can do with crossbow you cant with a vertical bow, execute the buttstroke.

    Of course Foremost Hunting is Crossbow Friendly so you can get the Truth Here should you wish to learn about the crossbow. It is your choice, not theirs. Myself and Dan Hendricks have written a complete course on the crossbow right here. Also you can go back and see what your state is about to go through in crossbow politics.

    Sure it will take a couple of years, I'm out of it now as it is legal in Louisiana. But here are some funny facts. The biggest joke of all are the archery shops, they will scream to high heavens to support the vertical bowman, their best customers of course. When its legalized they automatically become Crossbow experts and stack them to the ceilings to sell. By the way good crossbows are really expensive go check a Scorpyd out, cool crossbow and the fastest, you can have it or a Weatherby Mark V for the same price. If the Archery Shops really support the NABC I dare you not to sell a crossbow once the inevitable happens.
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    03 Jan 2011 01:24 PM
    The Wisconsin Bowhunter's Association loses credibility every time they open their mouth? Do they not know thier own history??? Bowhunting was harshly criticized when it began in the state and it took them several years to get it approved. Now they are fighting crossbows? They don't give a crap about hunting, they care about their hunting. They get to hunt during the rut when no one else gets to hunt and protect that like a holy grail. We need more hunters in the sport and whatever opens the door for that, I'm in favor of. It's time the WBA starts thinking about the sport and not just themselves.
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    03 Jan 2011 04:04 PM

    And so it starts, as a representative of the ACF I ask that all pro crossbow folks keep a civil tongue and watch how the other guys hang themselves. Crossbow people are bow and gun hunters as well just like me we dont cut down anyone Else's sport. However dont let anyone cut yours down either.

    To give equal time from one of my good friends and partners I would like to refer you to Foremost Archery a new website by foremost media. When you read his comments you will see exactly what I'm talking about. I urge him to continue his efforts in such a manner as a true archery professional as this will be the perfect attitude to display when bringing the case against the crossbow to the Wisconsin Legislature.....the defence rests. 

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    10 Jan 2011 04:11 PM
    A lot of crossbows are pretty expensive but Horton has a few that are under $500 and ready to go. You can't buy a decent vertical bow for that. Now, if we can just get these legalized!
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    10 Jan 2011 05:35 PM
    I have to admit before I knew anything about crossbows I was a skeptic but after talking to a few folks in the know I'm all in favor. The biggest selling point for me was that the range isn't really that much better then my compound bow. Hey, if it gets more guys in the woods I'm all for it.
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    16 Jan 2011 07:25 PM
    To say there isn't an advantage to using a crossbow is lying. The fact is, with a crossbow you can rest the stock on a treestand rail or tree and wait for the deer to come into you r lane before firing. Even if you buy the fact that the range is no better than a compound bow, the fact that you can rest the stock takes a lot of the jitters out of the shooting. That is a huge advantage.
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    27 Jan 2011 08:15 PM
    And a compound bow is an advantage over a long bow. And a long bow is an advantage to a spear. And a spear is an advantage to a rock. The fact is they are different weapons and both have their positive and negative features. If you regard archery season as a "traditional weapons" season, then put that compound bow down and start using "traditional weapons". That goes for those fancy new broadheads too. If we want to call it archery season, then let ALL archers be a part of the season.
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    04 Feb 2011 06:38 AM

    On resting the crossbow, yes you can do that. It is a good thing too because it makes up for the awkwardness of maneuvering it around in a tree stand. It is a chore to maneuver it in a tight ground blind even more. The worst part is the noise, and jumping the string problem, they just haven't figured out how to silence a crossbow yet. Oh by the way I have figured out how to silence a crossbow but as usual the companies won't listen. Limbsavers dont even start.

    As far as accuracy it depends on who is doing the shooting. It is about even out to 40 yards then the compound shooters take the lead. A compound deer kill at 70 yards is not uncommon with a good vertical archer. A good crossbow shooter would not attempt this as the deer would jump the string. I made a perfect shot at 45 yards but the 8 point jumped completely out of the scope, before the arrow got there. It is things like this you must understand when discussing the merits of vertical and horizontal bowhunting. It is 6 of one and half dozen of the other.

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    13 Apr 2011 12:27 AM
    I interviewed Dan Hendricks a while back. Here's the interview.

    http://www.foremosthunting.com/Reso...fault.aspx

    Not all crossbows are expensive. Horton has a few models well under $500.

    -CL
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    02 Jan 2012 08:15 AM
    The right to choose how one wants to hunt, including the weapon of choice, is an important ingredient in what makes us happy. Those unfortunate souls who live in a State which makes these choices for them live in totalitarian state. We respect the right of those who choose to use vertical bows to do so, we only ask that they respect our right to use the crossbow if that is what we want to do. Now there is a "rational basis test", that is, there can be a rational basis for banning a particular type of hunting weapon. For example, machine guns. I would think most hunters would agree machine guns are not suitable hunting weapons, but what is the rational basis of banning crossbows if we allow compound bows? There are now 22 states which allow crossbows into the archery season and in all of the debates which took place, no one has shown that crossbow use has harmed the resource, that crossbows are more effective than compounds, or that there is a rational basis to ban crossbows and not compound bows.

    One other issue: often the anti-crossbow side makes the claim that crossbows are some how not ethical or that they take the "hard" out of hunting. The assumption is based on hubris and is a faulty argumentative ploy. Just because one wants to assume some personal challenge, for example, archery v. guns, does not grant entitlement. Unfortunately many in the archery community believe it does. Those who argue this brand of "me-ism" are arguing that because they are (traditional?) archers, the State, in statute, must provide them with special seasons and privileges which they alone deserve. Give me a break! Those of us who have lived long enough to have experienced the 1960s know that you can buy a bus ticket, get on board and take a seat, but that does not entitle you to a guaranteed seat at the front of the bus.
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    28 Jan 2012 08:30 PM
    Posted By j3cub on 02 Jan 2012 08:15 AM
    The right to choose how one wants to hunt, including the weapon of choice, is an important ingredient in what makes us happy. Those unfortunate souls who live in a State which makes these choices for them live in totalitarian state. We respect the right of those who choose to use vertical bows to do so, we only ask that they respect our right to use the crossbow if that is what we want to do. Now there is a "rational basis test", that is, there can be a rational basis for banning a particular type of hunting weapon. For example, machine guns. I would think most hunters would agree machine guns are not suitable hunting weapons, but what is the rational basis of banning crossbows if we allow compound bows? There are now 22 states which allow crossbows into the archery season and in all of the debates which took place, no one has shown that crossbow use has harmed the resource, that crossbows are more effective than compounds, or that there is a rational basis to ban crossbows and not compound bows.

    One other issue: often the anti-crossbow side makes the claim that crossbows are some how not ethical or that they take the "hard" out of hunting. The assumption is based on hubris and is a faulty argumentative ploy. Just because one wants to assume some personal challenge, for example, archery v. guns, does not grant entitlement. Unfortunately many in the archery community believe it does. Those who argue this brand of "me-ism" are arguing that because they are (traditional?) archers, the State, in statute, must provide them with special seasons and privileges which they alone deserve. Give me a break! Those of us who have lived long enough to have experienced the 1960s know that you can buy a bus ticket, get on board and take a seat, but that does not entitle you to a guaranteed seat at the front of the bus.
    Nice, John. I'm stealin' it, K?

     

    Chris LarsenUser is Offline
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    10 Feb 2012 01:04 AM
    The public voted for several issues in last year's Spring Hearings. Only one of those recommendations were not passed by the DNR.... changing the crossbow age from 65 to 55.
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    10 Feb 2012 12:40 PM
    I have read this post; this is a tough topic. I don't know much about crossbows, I've never used one. I understand that as far as range goes, there might not be much of an advantage as far as that weapon is concerned over a traditional/veritical bow. However, I think what a lot of poeple get caught up on is that the crossbow, like a firearm, gets loaded and is ready to shoot, whenever. You load a bolt, and it is ready to fire when the opportunity presents itself. Archery hunters whom I have discussed this issue with in the past struggle with that the most. The process of getting your bow up and ready, pulling back, holding if need be, and getting ready and locked in for a shot is, in many opinions, what ultimately seperates the archery from the firearm hunting. Obviously range is important too, but I don't think many people believe you can shoot 70+ yards with crossbow accurately on a regular basis. In my opinion, it is the method and delivery of the shot. However flawed that notion is, for a lot of the people I talk to about this, that is difficult to get past.
    Chris LarsenUser is Offline
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    Chris Larsen

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    12 Feb 2012 06:40 PM
    The issue isn't whether or not it's harder to kill a deer with a crossbow or a vertical bow. The issue is, is a crossbow archery equipment? If we want to get into what is easier and what is not, is it easier to kill a deer with a compound bow than a long bow? Is it easier to kill a deer with carbon arrows than a wooden arrow? Is it easier to kill a deer with a range finder than not? Does it matter? This is one of the reasons the Pope & Young Club gets me so mad. If you kill a deer using lighted nocks it doesn't count for P&Y. But you can use a range finder, scent lok clothing, and any other gadgetry. Even though a lighted nock doesn't help you kill a deer. Lighted nocks help with recovery. Is that a bad thing? I don't think it's a bad thing that bow hunters are using fiber optic sights, carbon arrows, mechanical broadheads, etc. These are tools that help kill in a more humane way. None of those things take away from the most challenging part of bow hunting... getting a deer close enough to take a good shot.

    This is why I would like to see crossbows used during archery seasons. Some people want to get out and hunt during the archery seasons but don't have the time to shoot a vertical bow effectively. I would rather put that person in the woods using a weapon that they can be effective with than having them in the woods with a vertical bow they don't shoot well or sitting on their couch at home. But maybe I'm weird. Some hunters would rather have the woods to themselves. Those are the guys who are fighting this. They don't see the long range picture. The more exclusionary we are, the closer we come to the day that no one will be hunting. If we truly want to preserve hunting and it's traditions, we should open more opportunities to prospective hunters.

    If the only consideration is "we need to make it difficult," we would all be hunting with the long bow or atlatl. The reason the compound bow was legalized(yes, there was a fight over that too) was that it took less practice to make more effective kill shots than with traditional archery equipment. The idea was that more people would be able to hunt. Of course, at that time all the traditional guys said the compound bow hunters would kill all the deer. Hmmm.. sounds familiar.
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